Quick Tuesday Tips on New Collections and Websites

Advertisement for Finley's Studio; North Georgia Citizen [Dalton GA] 10 July 1919 p.2

Advertisement for Finley’s Studio; North Georgia Citizen [Dalton GA] 10 July 1919 p.2

My day, week, month of March was made when the Digital Library of Georgia announced the addition of The North Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive to its wonderful, growing collection of our state’s historic newspapers. Coverage includes newspapers of various dates from the cities of Dalton, Gainesville and Rome. And as a bonus (for me) this is the third site, Athens and Savannah being two others, that can be accessed via any computer operating system. A real plus for Mac users.   http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/ngnewspapers

Here are some other tidbits of useful information I recently came across.

  • Cindy Freed’s Genealogy Circle had a nice post called “Where Do I Find My Civil War Ancestor’s Photo?” Where indeed! Links are provided not only to the “obvious” sites, but to some you may not have thought of such as Civil War Richmond, a site run by Michael D. Gorman. Did you remember to check Dead Fred, Ebay, and Shorpy? Take a look at her post http://tinyurl.com/kk4m6bf

In the ever fascinating-to-me topic of Researching Photographers Working in the South, take a look at these.

  • A collection now at the The University of North Texas Special Collections department has been announced.  Although it is still being processed, it should be available for research later this year. The Byrd Williams Family Photography Collection documents four generations of the work of a Fort Worth, Texas family of photographers: Byrd Moore Williams, his son “Jr.” (II), and his son (III), and his son (IV), the donor, who is an instructor of photography and an artist.
Four generations of photographers, left to right: Byrd Moore Williams, his son, grandson and great grandson;Byrd Williams Family Photography Collection, Special Collections Dept., University of North Texas

Four generations of photographers, left to right: Byrd Moore Williams, his son, grandson and great grandson; Byrd Williams Family Photography Collection, Special Collections Dept., University of North Texas

This photographing family shot thousands of images of the Ft. Worth area as well as around the state, “ranging from Pancho Villa’s soldiers to author Larry McMurtry, from western landscapes to street life in Fort Worth.” In addition to the photographs, the collection contains family correspondence, artifacts, and cameras. You can see some of the photos, and hear an interview with Byrd Williams, IV at http://tinyurl.com/oa2kzhr  Read about this huge collection via the UNT Library’s Special Collections http://tinyurl.com/n862l2o

  • Another of the UNT Special Collections pertaining to photographers is the focus of an online exhibit from their large archive of horse and ranching photography. Ray Bankston, Don Shugart and John Stryker are the selected photographers whose work is in Bankston, Shugart and Stryker: Texas Horse Country Photographers. See their photographs at http://tinyurl.com/p6ljxtz
  • I recently learned via the Georgia Genealogical Society Quarterly “Question & Answer” column by Robert S. Davis, about a University of Alabama professor’s photographs which are online, called the Roland McMillan Harper Photo Collection. These many photographs include botanical and geological subjects, images of farms, people, houses, etc. The photos cover 31 states including Alabama (2545), Florida (1527), Georgia (678), Arkansas (107) and Maryland (106), but also New York (164) and California (111).
"Small farm-house, northern type, about 5 miles from Loxley [Baldwin County AL], abandoned"; courtesy Roland McMillan Harper Photo Collection, University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama

“Small farm-house, northern type, about 5 miles from Loxley [Baldwin County AL], abandoned”; courtesy Roland McMillan Harper Photo Collection, University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama

Harper, an amateur photographer, put his photos into scrapbooks, organized them by state, and annotated and assigned each an identification number keyed to the scrapbook page and item number. He was quite the archivist, and a man after my own heart. See this and other digitized collections in the University of Alabama’s Acumen, their digital archives explorer. http://acumen.lib.ua.edu/u0001_2008032

  •  A source for various 19th and early 20th century photographers names and images is Langdon’s List of 19th and Early 2oth Century Photographers found at http://www.langdonroad.com/

Names can be listed by state, so narrowing the list to those included for Georgia gives me an in-process list of several names, but no other data. If you want a photographer’s address(es) and date(s) of operation, you will have to pay.

I do not understand that, but I believe photo-historians should, must share information. Otherwise, why do this? Sharing my research is why this blog exists.

If you go to the Langdon’s Photo Gallery you can see a number of images with a list of photographers’ and identified person’s names. I did notice at least one Georgia photographer’s name misspelled and the city and county names confused for one another with the image of his cabinet card. That said, there is much to find here that may give you other clues to aid your search.

Have a wonderful week in your Hunting and Gathering of information, whatever your topic. If something in this post will further your quest, or poses other questions to have answered – good, have fun!

© E. Lee Eltzroth and Hunting & Gathering, 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without  written permission from this blog’s author is prohibited. The piece can be re-blogged, and excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to E. Lee Eltzroth and Hunting & Gathering, with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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